Call for tenders: Evaluation of Africa Educational Trust’s Learning for Livelihood

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Employer: AET
Job Title: Call for tenders: Evaluation of Africa Educational Trust’s Learning for Livelihood Featured job
Job Type: Full-Time
Location: Somaliland; Puntland; Somalia
Category: Other
Description:

Call for tenders: Evaluation of Africa Educational Trust’s Learning for Livelihood in Somalia

Closing Date: 1st February

Africa Educational Trust (AET) is seeking bids from experienced consultants to deliver a high-quality evaluation of our work with Female Headed Households in Somaliland, Puntland and Central and South Somalia.

Background:

The Learning for Livelihoods project is a three-year project (1st April 2016 - 31st March 2019 funded by DFID. The project aims to support 3,200 of the most vulnerable Somali households out of extreme poverty and dependence on external aid/alms by giving them the skills and assets they need to establish themselves in work or business. The project is being delivered by Africa Educational Trust (AET) in Somaliland, Puntland and Central and South Somalia. The planned project outcomes were:

  • Enhanced learning and life skills among vulnerable households
  • Enhanced livelihood skills and assets among vulnerable households
  • Enhanced community action to support vulnerable households out of poverty

Purpose of the Final Evaluation

The purpose of the Final Evaluation is to assess the extent to which the delivery of the FHH project has achieved its planned objectives, and to identify lessons for future projects. Full details can be found in the attached Terms of Reference.

Required skills and competencies of the evaluator:

  • Strong background in non-formal education and development
  • Strong background in utilising qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • Experience of working with vulnerable groups
  • Experience of using participatory methods
  • Experience of conducting evaluations or research in Africa
  • Written and spoken Somali is desirable.

Application notes:

Closing date for applications: 1st February 2019. To apply please send a CV, a brief proposal on how you will address the Terms of Reference, costing and a copy of a similar evaluation report you have undertaken previously to hr@africaeducationaltrust.org  

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE LEARNING FOR LIVELIHOOD PROJECT (DFID GRANT GPAF-IMP-116)

The Learning for Livelihoods project is a three-year project (1st April 2016 - 31st March 2019 funded by DFID. The project aims to support 3,200 of the most vulnerable Somali households out of extreme poverty and dependence on external aid/alms by giving them the skills and assets they need to establish themselves in work or business. The project is being delivered by Africa Educational Trust (AET) in Somaliland, Puntland and Central and South Somalia.

The project aims to enhance income and livelihoods resilience among 3,200 vulnerable households (90% female). Beneficiaries are first equipped with functional literacy and numeracy skills needed to operate effectively in the local economy.  The inclusion of social issues in this training and the continuing engagement of community leaders is intended to build the confidence of beneficiaries to address social obstacles and strengthen social support structures in the community. Beneficiaries then have the opportunity to undertake training in financial literacy and a livelihoods skill of their choice. AET has partnered with MicroDahab to provide loans to beneficiaries completing skills training, so they can establish themselves in business.

Purpose of the Final Evaluation

The purpose of the Final Evaluation is to assess the extent to which the delivery of the FHH project has achieved its planned objectives, and to identify lessons for future projects.

Scope of work

At the project level

The objectives are to:

  • Assess the relevance of the original objectives in terms of whether they were achievable and whether they met the needs and priorities of the target group.
  • Assess whether the project activities generated the planned outputs and were they delivered on time? How were work plans adapted during the life of the project? Did the project activities represent good value for money?
  • Assess the achievement of project outputs and outcomes and the overall impact on the lives of beneficiaries and local communities

o   How have participants benefitted from literacy and numeracy skills, business and livelihoods skills training?

o   In what ways has the project contributed to greater economic empowerment and quality of life for the beneficiaries?

o   To what extent are beneficiaries engaged in new business or employment?

o   To what extent has the beneficiaries been able to access microfinance? What are the factors that enable or hinder access to loans? What could a long-term financial model look like? How sustainable is the revolving fund?

o   How have the microloans helped beneficiaries to develop their businesses? How has household income changed as a result of receiving a loan? Would they apply for a second loan?

o   What happened to households not accessing micro-loans – were they still able to develop new livelihoods? What were the reasons for not seeking loans?

o   How effective was community engagement in addressing issues of protection and assistance for female headed households?

o   To what extent was the project able to reach the most vulnerable, including people with disabilities?

  • Review significant achievements the project has brought about. Which approaches worked particularly well and why and which less well and why? Any unexpected or unintended outcomes – both positive and negative?
  • Gather feedback about the project from people affected by the activities and provide an opportunity for them to participate in analyzing project achievements
  • Assess the extent to which the benefits received by the target group are having a wider overall effect on larger numbers of people in the communities or regions as a whole.
  • Assess whether the positive outcomes of the project are likely to continue after the end of the project.
  • Make recommendations for future interventions and projects. How could the project model be scaled up or replicated?

The evaluator should focus on the outcomes and sustainability of the project.

At organization level

  • Assess the extent to which the project’s structure has enabled it to meet its objectives and the needs of the target groups
  • Assess the effectiveness of the monitoring, evaluation and learning system and tools used to measure success
  • Review actual expenditure against planned expenditure to assess whether spending reflects project priorities 

On partnerships

  • Assess the effectiveness of collaboration with government, NGOs and the private sector to support the achievement of project outcomes and ensure the project has a long-term future.
  • Explore and document the development of the relationship with our partner banks and learning for future similar projects.

It is important that the Final Evaluation is a transparent examination of activities against the planned results, so that lessons for future projects can be learned. It is recognised that there will be some unexpected outcomes, both positive and negative.

The Final Evaluation Process 

The Final Evaluation will take place at the end of February 2019.

The evaluation will be led by an independent consultantin conjunction with HWA and AET staff. The consultant will undertake a visit to the three regions of Somalia to conduct field work.  

The evaluation process should include the following activities:

  • A desk review of project information provided by AET
  • Interviews with staff from AET to collect information on achievements and impact and difficulties faced during implementation, including management, monitoring and reporting
  • Focus Group Discussions and Interviews with key project stakeholders and beneficiaries in the field.
  • Interviews with officials from Ministry of Education and Microfinance Institutions.
  • The consultant will present a preliminary overview of their findings to AET before preparing their report by end of March 2019.
  • The consultant should submit the draft report to AET for written comments before finalising the report, to minimise the chance of inaccuracies and to maximise ownership of the findings

The following documents should beexamined as part of the Final Evaluation:

a.       The approved project proposal document

b.      The project log frame

c.       Year 1 and 2 Annual Report and Year 3 quarterly reports, including financial information

d.  The baseline report and report on the Vulnerability survey

e.      Data on beneficiary numbers

f.        Any other relevant documentation, as requested by the consultants  

The following stakeholders and beneficiaries should be consulted:

  • AET and HWA staff
  • Household heads participating in the project
  • Literacy and numeracy tutors
  • Vocational skills tutors
  • Local leaders
  • Dahabshil and Premium bank loan officers

The scope of this evaluation is limited. It is not feasible for it to be an exhaustive review covering all of the work undertaken and all participants in detail. Instead, a sample of approximately 5% of participating communities from the three regions will be involved in the Final Evaluation.

Outputs of the Final Evaluation

The Final Evaluation should result in a report of no more than 30 pages for the main body, including an Executive Summary. The report should address the areas listed in this TOR. The report should include a good level of critical analysis and the report’s authors should support their analysis of a project’s achievements with relevant quantitative and qualitative data and state how this has been sourced. Recommendations should also include details as to how they might be implemented

Roles and Responsibilities

The roles and responsibilities for the Final Evaluation are set out below:

a.       Evaluator:

  • Undertaking a desk review of key project documents
  • Designing the interviews and focus group questions/ approach
  • Visiting the three regions to gather data for the evaluation (including holding interviews and focus groups)
  • Presenting the preliminary findings to AET
  • Producing a draft report and a final version in response to comments from AET  

b.      Africa Educational Trust

  • Co-ordinating the Final Evaluation and agreeing the budget
  • Commissioning and supervising the evaluator
  • Liaising with HWA on the logistics and schedule for the field visit
  • Taking a final decision on the interpretation of these Terms of Reference, should any dispute or confusion arise
  • Agreeing the format for the evaluation report
  • Providing feedback on the preliminary findings and draft report, and agreeing the final report
  • Submitting the final evaluation report to DFID and responding to any feedback or queries from DFID
  • Providing logistical support including vehicle, driver, fuel, airtime and accommodation in the field[1]
  • Working with the consultant to identify a suitable sample of stakeholders and beneficiaries and set up the focus groups and interviews
  • Scheduling meetings
  • Providing translation support for focus groups and interviews with beneficiaries (as needed)
  • Providing feedback on the preliminary findings and draft report 

[1] Accommodation costs will be covered by the consultants’ DSA but AET should book the rooms.

Publish date: 2019-01-20 11:03:07
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